Top 50+Bill Nye Quotes

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Who is Bill Nye

Bill Nye is an American science educator and mechanical engineer best known for hosting the television program Bill Nye the Science Guy. After graduating from Cornell University, he moved to Seattle to work as a mechanical engineer for Boeing and eventually became a comedy show writer and performer.

Bill Nye Quotes

1. The more you find out about the world, the more opportunities there are to laugh at it.

2. Science is the key to our future, and if you don’t believe in science, then you’re holding everybody back. And it’s fine if you as an adult want to run around pretending or claiming that you don’t believe in evolution, but if we educate a generation of people who don’t believe in science, that’s a recipe for disaster. We talk about the Internet. That comes from science. Weather forecasting. That comes from science. The main idea in all of biology is evolution. To not teach it to our young people is wrong.

3. Wagner’s music is better than it sounds.

4. To leave the world better than you found it, sometimes you have to pick up other people’s trash.

5. Hard to find anything lovelier than a tree. They grow at right angles to a tangent of the nominal sphere of the Earth.

6. Humor is everywhere, in that there’s irony in just about anything a human does.

7. The moon is out all day. I don’t want to shock you.

8. The natural world is a package deal; you don’t get to select which facts you like and which you don’t.

9. I’ll admit that the discovery of evolution is humbling, but it is also empowering. It transforms our relationship to the life around us. Instead of being outsiders watching the natural world go by, we are insiders. We are part of the process; we are the exquisite result of billions of years of natural research and development.

10. America had many other discoverers besides Columbus, but he seems to have made more satisfactory arrangements with the historians than any of the others.

11. What happens to other species also happens to us.

12. Everyone that you’ll ever met wil know someone that you won’t

13. The Earth is not 6,000 or 10,000 years old. It’s not. And if that conflicts with your beliefs, I strongly feel you should question your beliefs.

14. How did we let an ideological resistance to inquiry become such a prominent part of our society?

15. History is but the record of the public and official acts of human beings. It is our object, therefore, to humanize our history and deal with people past and present; people who ate and possibly drank; people who were born, flourished and died; not grave tragedians, posing perpetually for their photographs.

16. Just a little climate change. Nothing to worry about.

17. If the argument is, “Well, that was all part of the plan,” then I have to ask: How can you take the lack of evidence of a plan as evidence of a plan? That makes no sense.

18. The essence of the evening was captured by a question from the audience. Someone asked: “What would it take to change your worldview?” My answer was simple: Any single piece of evidence. If we found a fossilized animal trying to swim between the layers of rock in the Grand Canyon, if we found a process by which a new huge fraction of a radioactive material’s neutrons could become protons in some heretofore fantastically short period of time, if we found a way to create eleven species a day, if there were some way for starlight to get here without going the speed of light, that would force me and every other scientist to look at the world in a new way. However, no such contradictory evidence has ever been found—not any, not ever.

19. To be successful as a living thing, you have to have offspring, who have offspring, who have offspring. Rest assured, your family did, or you wouldn’t be here. As troubling as it may seem, your parents had sex—at least once. If you have brothers and sisters, more than once … One shudders to think of it.

20. Science is the best idea humans have ever had.

21. People love dogs. This is, I hope, the least surprising sentence you will read in this book. I myself have had long discussions with my dog friends, and by that I mean my friends who are dogs.

22. The natural world is a package deal; you don’t get to select which facts you like and which you don’t.

23. The process of testing claims is called science. Now, If you have a claim that can’t be tested thats what we call pseudo-science. The difference between pseudo-science and science is whether or not you can test it.

24. There is a deep-seated reason why intelligent, sensible people suddenly recoil from objective evidence when the topic turns to evolution. I think the fear of death has a lot to do with it.

25. From time to time, I meet someone who will say something like, “I am not afraid of dying.” I don’t buy it. Everyone is afraid of dying. It’s part of the instinct that helps us survive as a species. It’s a crucial feature of human evolution. It’s also, I strongly suspect, a crucial reason why so many people have trouble believing evolution is true. Life can be ironic like that.

26. When religions disagree about just creation, there is nothing to do but argue. When two scientists disagree about evolution, they confer with colleagues, develop theories, collect evidence, and arrive at a more complete understanding. Every question leads to new answers, new discoveries, and new smarter questions. The science of evolution is as expansive as nature itself.

27. Some of the most wonderful aspects and consequences of evolution have been discovered only recently. This is in stark contrast to creationism, which offers a static view of the world, one that cannot be challenged or tested with reason. And because it cannot make predictions, it cannot lead to new discoveries, new medicines, or new ways to feed all of us.

28. They avoid the exploration of evolution, because it reminds us all that humankind may not be that special in nature’s scheme. What happens to other species also happens to us.

29. This is one of the reasons I get such joy from studying evolution. This kind of science is amazing and sexy.

30. Winter lingered so long in the lap of Spring, that it occasioned a great deal of talk.

31. Every question leads to new answers, new discoveries, and new smarter questions.

32. One organism’s trash is another organism’s treasure, as I like to say.

33. Try this way of picturing a human lifespan. The National Football League’s Dallas Cowboys’ stadium holds 105,000 people. Now, imagine that you’re watching life go by down on the field, and every day you watch that life go by from a different seat. You don’t even get a third of the way around. Before you’ve settled into a third of the seats, you’d be dead. And, that’s if you had a good run, eighty-two-plus years. Yikes!

34. Nothing is too wonderful to be true, if it be consistent with the laws of nature.

35. Altruism is not a moral or religious ideal, no matter what some people might tell you, it is an essential biological part of who or what we are as a species.

36. As I learned more about evolution, I realized that from nature’s point of view, you and I ain’t such a big deal. Humans are just another species on this planet trying to make a go of it, trying to pass our genes into the future, just like chrysanthemums, muskrats, sea jellies, poison ivy … and bumblebees.

37. With that in mind, here’s my Nerd Code of Conduct: ■Be open and be honest. ■Don’t pretend you know what you don’t know (often a little too easy to do). ■Show the world as it is, rather than the way you wish it would be. ■Respect facts; don’t deny them just because you don’t like them. ■Move forward only after you trust your design.

38. Humans Control the Earth; Nerds Should Guide the Humans

39. It was fun for me also to point out that this brand of young-Earth creationism claims that kangaroos came from a huge ship, the ark, which is supposed to have safely run aground on Mount Ararat in modern-day Turkey. It’s a respectable peak—5,165 meters (almost 17,000 feet)—and it’s snowcapped. It’s not clear to me how all the animals and humans made the arduous descent. The kangaroos, both of them, are supposed to have made it down the mountain, ran or hopped from there to Australia—and no one saw them. Furthermore, if they took a reasonable amount of time to make the trip, you’d expect some kangaroo pups or joeys to have been born and some adults to have died along the way. You’d expect some kangaroo fossils out there somewhere in what is now Laos or Tibet. Also, they are supposed to have run across a land bridge from Eurasia to Australia. But there’s no evidence of such a bridge or any kangaroo fossils in that area, not any.

40. Any differences we traditionally associate with race are a produce of our need for vitamin D and our relationship to the Sun.

41. As an engineer trained in the U.S., I look at the assault on evolution—which is actually an assault on science overall—as much more than an intellectual issue; for me, it’s personal. I feel strongly that we need the young people of today to become the scientists and the engineers of tomorrow so that my native United States continues to be a world leader in discovery and innovation. If we suppress science in this country, we are headed for trouble

42. Science is the way in which we know nature and our place within it.

43. Inherent in this rejection of evolution is the idea that your curiosity about the world is misplaced and your common sense is wrong. This attack on reason is an attack on all of us. Children who accept this ludicrous perspective will find themselves opposed to progress. They will become society’s burdens rather than its producers, a prospect that I find very troubling. Not only that, these kids will never feel the joy of discovery that science brings. They will have to suppress the basic human curiosity that leads to asking questions, exploring the world around them, and making discoveries. They will miss out on countless exciting adventures. We’re robbing them of basic knowledge about their world and the joy that comes with it. It breaks my heart.

44. Someone asked: “What would it take to change your worldview?” My answer was simple: Any single piece of evidence. If we found a fossilized animal trying to swim between the layers of rock in the Grand Canyon, if we found a process by which a new huge fraction of a radioactive material’s neutrons could become protons in some heretofore fantastically short period of time, if we found a way to create eleven species a day, if there were some way for starlight to get here without going the speed of light, that would force me and every other scientist to look at the world in a new way. However, no such contradictory evidence has ever been found—not any, not ever. Mr. Ham responded that nothing would change his mind. He has a book that he believes provides all the answers to any natural science question that could ever be posed. No piece of evidence would change his mind—not any, not ever. Imagine this man or some of his followers on a jury. If their minds were made up, there would be nothing for the defense or prosecuting attorneys to do. No evidence would sway these jurors. They would refuse to use their intellect to assess the quality of evidence.

45. Nature, everywhere the most amazingly and outstandingly remarkable producer of living bodies, being most carefully arranged according to physical, mechanical, and chemical laws, does not give even the smallest hint of its extraordinary and tireless workings and quite clearly points to its work as being alone worthy of a benign and omnipotent God.

46. All of us, everyone reading these words, have made it this far in life. None of us would be here if we weren’t genetically good enough. That’s a rather encouraging thought. We celebrate certain people’s appearance or their wit, but we are all so much more alike than we are different. The proof is in the living: We all made it. No matter how ugly you think someone else is, he or she got here just like (as) you did. There’s a lid for every pot, as the saying goes.

47. If your house is on fire, you don’t comfort yourself with the thought that houses have been catching fire for thousands of years. You don’t sit idly back and think, “Oh well, that is the way of nature.” You get going, immediately. And you don’t spring into action because of an idealistic notion that houses deserve to be saved. You do it because if you don’t, you won’t have a place to live.

48. We also happen to have had two superpowers that came into existence after a series of world-consuming conflicts. Through a terrible act of disenchantment, one world leader was killed, and his policy of racing to the Moon became a nation’s policy, which drove members of our species to create space programs around the world. As a result, when an asteroid that could once again destroy the dominant form of life comes along, that dominant species (you and me) is ready to do something about that rock or block of ice.

49. To leave the world better than you found it, sometimes you have to pick up other people’s trash.

50. THe problems don’t care who solves them.

51. So remarkably deaf was my grandfather Squeers That he had to wear lightning-rods over his ears To even hear thunder, and oftentimes then He was forced to request it to thunder again.

52. Since it was developed in the nineteenth century, the theory itself has also evolved, by which I mean that it’s been refined and expanded. Some of the most wonderful aspects and consequences of evolution have been discovered only recently. This is in stark contrast to creationism, which offers a static view of the world, one that cannot be challenged or tested with reason. And because it cannot make predictions, it cannot lead to new discoveries, new medicines, or new ways to feed all of us.

53. I feel strongly that we need the young people of today to become the scientists and the engineers of tomorrow so that my native United States continues to be a world leader in discovery and innovation. If we suppress science in this country, we are headed for trouble.

54. This is a book about everything. It is about everything I know and about everything I think you should know, too.

55. I often reflect on what an extraordinary time (pun intended) it is to be alive here in the beginning of the twenty-first century. It took life billions of years to get to this point. It took humans thousands of years to piece together a meaningful understanding of our cosmos, our planet, and ourselves. Think how fortunate we are to know this much. But think also of all that’s yet to be discovered. Here’s hoping the deep answers to the deep questions—from the nature of consciousness to the origin of life—will be found in not too much more time.

56. Scientifically speaking, there is tribalism and group bias, but there cannot be any such thing as racism. We are all one.

57. I suspect everyone there can reason along the lines I described…It’s just that when it comes to evolution, and especially to the related realization that we are all pretty small bits of the universe, it seems as though Ham and his followers just can’t handle the truth. They throw aside their common sense and cling to the hope that there’s something that makes it okay to *not* think for themselves.””The irony is, in the process they are walking away from our ability to understand who we are, where we came from, and how we fit into a cosmos…If there is something divine in our nature, something that sets humans apart from all creatures, surely our ability to reason is a key part of it. The irony is, in the process they are walking away from our ability to understand who we are, where we came from, and how we fit into a cosmos…If there is something divine in our nature, something that sets humans apart from all creatures, surely our ability to reason is a key part of it.

58. The only way to get the answers is to keep looking at living things and learning more about the process by which we all came to be. Evolution happens here no matter how we all got started. But now we can start to ask meaningfully about origins and destinies as well. We will go to thrilling places—unimaginable places—if only we keep our minds open to new ideas, our faculties keen to significant pieces of evidence, our youthful curiosities forever engaged. Where did we come from? Are we alone? Search on!

59. We are a result of evolution, and therefore so are our creations—both the not-so-good and very good. It’s glorious.

60. In his writings, Darwin makes it clear that he cannot state whether or not there is a creator in charge. The idea was impossible to prove or disprove then, and it still is today.

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