Top 50+Jane Austen Quotes

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Who is Jane Austen

Jane Austen was a Georgian era author, best known for her social commentary in novels including ‘Sense and Sensibility,’ ‘Pride and Prejudice’ and ‘Emma.’

While not widely known in her own time, Jane Austen’s comic novels of love among the landed gentry gained popularity after 1869, and her reputation skyrocketed in the 20th century. Her novels, including Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility, are considered literary classics, bridging the gap between romance and realism.

The seventh child and second daughter of Cassandra and George Austen, Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775, in Steventon, Hampshire, England. Austen’s parents were well-respected community members. Her father served as the Oxford-educated rector for a nearby Anglican parish. The family was close and the children grew up in an environment that stressed learning and creative thinking. When Austen was young, she and her siblings were encouraged to read from their father’s extensive library. The children also authored and put on plays and charades.

Jane Austen Quotes

1. The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.

2. There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves, it is not my nature.

3. I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! — When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.

4. A lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.

5. In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

6. I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.

7. The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!

8. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

9. There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.

10. I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.

11. Angry people are not always wise.

12. Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.

13. I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.

14. but for my own part, if a book is well written, I always find it too short.

15. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope…I have loved none but you.
16. What are men to rocks and mountains?

17. There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.

18. I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.

19. Ah! There is nothing like staying at home, for real comfort.

20. I must learn to be content with being happier than I deserve.

21. The Very first moment I beheld him, my heart was irrevocably gone.

22. It isn’t what we say or think that defines us, but what we do.

23. Silly things do cease to be silly if they are done by sensible people in an impudent way.

24. Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.

25. Laugh as much as you choose, but you will not laugh me out of my opinion.

26. I have not the pleasure of understanding you.

27. I have not the pleasure of understanding you.

28. You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever.

29. I am the happiest creature in the world. Perhaps other people have said so before, but not one with such justice. I am happier even than Jane; she only smiles, I laugh.

30. If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more.

31. Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody.

32. To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.

33. My idea of good company…is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.’
‘You are mistaken,’ said he gently, ‘that is not good company, that is the best.

34. From the very beginning— from the first moment, I may almost say— of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.

35. For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?

36. I always deserve the best treatment because I never put up with any other.

37. You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.

38. We are all fools in love

39. It is only a novel… or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best-chosen language

40. I have faults enough, but they are not, I hope, of understanding. My temper I dare not vouch for. It is, I believe, too little yielding— certainly too little for the convenience of the world. I cannot forget the follies and vices of other so soon as I ought, nor their offenses against myself. My feelings are not puffed about with every attempt to move them. My temper would perhaps be called resentful. My good opinion once lost, is lost forever.

41. An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do.

42. Life seems but a quick succession of busy nothings.

43. Till this moment I never knew myself.

44. We all know him to be a proud, unpleasant sort of man; but this would be nothing if you really liked him.

45. He is a gentleman, and I am a gentleman’s daughter. So far we are equal.

46. My good opinion once lost is lost forever.

47. If I could but know his heart, everything would become easy.

48. A girl likes to be crossed a little in love now and then.
It is something to think of
49. There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil, a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome.”
“And your defect is a propensity to hate everybody.”
“And yours,” he replied with a smile, “is wilfully to misunderstand them.

50. Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised or a little mistaken.

51. Nothing ever fatigues me, but doing what I do not like.

52. Her heart did whisper that he had done it for her.

53. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

54. I cannot make speeches, Emma…If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more. But you know what I am. You hear nothing but truth from me. I have blamed you, and lectured you, and you have borne it as no other woman in England would have borne it.

55. There could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison

56. The distance is nothing when one has a motive.

58. What strange creatures brothers are!

59. I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman’s inconstancy. Songs and proverbs, all talk of woman’s fickleness. But perhaps you will say, these were all written by men.

60. Perhaps I shall. Yes, yes, if you please, no reference to examples in books. Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.

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