Top 50+ Cicero Quotes

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Cicero, a Roman statements, lawyer and philosopher was alive between 106 BC and 43 BC, playing a vital political role during the time that the Roman Republic ended and the Roman Empire started. Whilst he is believed to be one of Rome’s greatest speakers, his efforts to resist the establishment of the Empire were ultimately in vain.

It was Cicero’s prose and influence of the language of Latin that makes him stand out, with many subsequent orators and writers reacting to his work or following his particular style, even up to the 1800s. He incorporated Hellenistic philosopher into Latin and added to the Latin vocabulary.

Cicero had an eventful political career, serving as Consul in 63 BC and stopped a revolt that aimed to overthrow the government. During the reign of Julius Caesar, he continued to champion republicanism and after Caesar’s death, Mark Anthony and the second triumvirate saw his as an enemy of the state and executed him in 43BC.

He is credited as an influence of the 14th century Renaissance and the 18th-century Enlightenment movement, thanks greatly to the discovery of extensive letters and writings credited as being Cicero. This is why his quotes are so sought after today, because of his influence almost 2000 years after his death.

1. Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.

2. The foundation of justice is good faith.

3. Art is born of the observation and investigation of nature.

4. There is no place more delightful than one’s own fireside.

5. I am not ashamed to confess I am ignorant of what I do not know.

6. Confidence is that feeling by which the mind embarks on great and honorable courses with a sure hope and trust in itself. Exercise and temperance can preserve something of our early strength even in old age.

7. Exercise and temperance can preserve something of our early strength even in old age.

8. The way to avoid the imputation of impudence is not to be ashamed of what we do, but never to do what we ought to be ashamed of.

9.As in the case of wines that improve with age, the oldest friendships ought to be the most delightful.

10.It is exercise alone that supports the spirits, and keeps the mind in vigor

11. It is a shameful thing to be weary of inquiry when what we search for is excellent.

12. Honor is the reward of virtue.

13. We were born to unite with our fellow men, and to join in community with the human race.

14. Let your desires be ruled by reason.

15. No wise man ever thought that a traitor should be trusted.

16. Diseases of the soul are more dangerous and more numerous than those of the body.

17. It is the peculiar quality of a fool to perceive the faults of others and to forget his own.

18. Diseases of the soul are more dangerous and more numerous than those of the body.

19. A friend is, as it were, a second self.

20. It is a true saying that One falsehood leads easily to another.

21. Hunger is the best seasoning for meat.

22. Nothing is more noble, nothing more venerable than fidelity. Faithfulness and truth are the most sacred excellences and endowments of the human mind.

23. Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.

24. A grateful heart is not only the greatest virtue, but the parent of all the other virtues.

25. Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all others.

26. Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all others.

27. Any man can make mistakes, but only an idiot persists in his error.

28. The authority of those who teach is often an obstacle to those who want to learn.

29. I am never less alone than when alone.

30. Thou shouldst eat to live, not live to eat.

31. No one dances sober, unless he is insane.

32. To disregard what the world thinks of us is not only arrogant but utterly shameless.

33. A life of peace, purity and refinement leads to a calm and untroubled old age

34. The soul in sleep gives proof of its divine nature.

35. The first duty of a man is the seeking after and the investigation of truth.

36. Secret enmities are more to be feared than open ones.

37. Justice consists of doing no one injury, decency in giving no one offense.

38. When you have no basis for an argument, abuse the plaintiff.

39. Bodily pleasure is unworthy of man’s superior endowments, and ought to be despised and spurned; and if there be any one who sets some value on sensual gratification, he should carefully keep it within due limits. Thus food and the care of the body should be ordered with reference to health and strength, not to sensual pleasure. Indeed, if we will only bear in mind what excellence and dignity belong to human nature, we shall understand how base it is to give one’s self up to luxury, and to live voluptuously and wantonly, and how honorable it is to live frugally, chastely, circumspectly, soberly.

40. Rashness belongs to youth; prudence to old age.

41. Let the punishment be proportionate to the offense.

42. If we lose affection and kindliness from our life: we lose all that gives it charm.

43. History is the witness that testifies to the passing of time; it illumines reality, vitalizes memory, provides guidance in daily life, and brings us tidings of antiquity.

44. He is never less at leisure than when at leisure, nor less alone than

45. when he is alone.

46. Friendship makes prosperity more brilliant, and lightens adversity by dividing and sharing it.

47. Friendship makes prosperity more brilliant and lightens adversity by dividing and sharing it.

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